Jennabug44’s Creative Photography


HDR assign. – Jenna Law
May 3, 2008, 3:13 am
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Creative Assign. #6 – Jenna Law

Some of these photos were taken in the West Bottoms in Kansas City. I photographed the outside of the Hobbs Building (Feast of Fancy is a catering company that rents out the main floor of the building for weddings, events, etc–the rest of the building is rented lofts). This is where my own wedding ceremony and reception is being held in May 2009. I also stopped by the KC SCOUT statue. My last stop was Nelson-Atkins art museum.

Click here for my slideshow.



Creative Assign. #5 – Jenna Law
April 25, 2008, 6:43 pm
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I recently moved to Prairie Village, KS from the Burg (YES!!! I’m finally outta here!). One of the first “nice” days, my fiance and I cruised around Kansas City on the hunt for my assignment. We stopped off at the American Royal. There was this huge wall of cut-out bull shapes in what looked like steel; perpendicular to that is the train yard.

Click here for my slideshow.



Walker Evans – Photographer
April 21, 2008, 4:02 am
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Short Bio:

Intimidated by the difficulty of writing, Walker Evans turned to photography in 1930. He did work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA). In 1941, Evans’ photographs of three white tenant families in southern Alabama during the Great Depression were published as the groundbreaking book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Evan”s photographs of the families made them icons of Depression-Era misery and poverty. Evans was a passionate reader and writer, and became a staff writer at Time magazine. He also became a professor of photography at Yale University.

My 2 cents:

Evans’ photographs of the Great Depression-era are full of rich environmental portraits. Through his photos, he showed the drab lifestyles of these families. His work is intriguing, but doesn’t particularly fit my taste.

Some of Walker Evans’ work:

To find more info or work of this photographer go here:
Link 1, Link 2



Bruce Davidson – Photographer
April 21, 2008, 3:36 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

Short Bio:

Bruce Davidson is an American photographer. He began taking pictures at the age of 10. In 1958, Davidson joined Magnum Photos. During the next few years, he photographed extensively, most notably producing Brooklyn Gang and The Dwarf. One of his most famous bodies of work is the events and effects of the Civil Rights Movement in both the North and the South. His next project, East 100th Street, is perhaps his most famous. East 100th Street was a two-year documentation of an infamous block in East Harlem. In 1988, Davidson returned to East 100th Street to document the revitalization, renewal, and changes that occurred in the 30 years since he last documented it.

My 2 cents:

Davidson’s work has an intimate feel to it. He photographed through a turbulent period and within it he found self-discovery. He captured everything from failure to triumph and the love and the hate. His photographs of East 100th Street are truly remarkable realities of those dealing with poverty and decay. His photos make very strong and bold statements.

Some of Bruce Davidson’s work:

To find more info or work of this photographer go here:
Link 1, Link 2, Link 3, Link 4



Wynn Bullock – Photographer
April 21, 2008, 2:55 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

Short Bio:

Wynn Bullock was an American photographer that is notable for his photographs of nudes and of landscapes on the West Coast. He started in the 1920s with a career as a concert tenor. While studying in Paris, he was inspired by visual artists, in particular, Man Ray. Upon his return to the US, he focused on a career as a photographer. He was a student at the Art Center School in Los Angeles, and in 1948, he met and began a lifelong friendship with Edward Weston. Bullock also explored the commercial side of photography, founding Arrow Camera. His photographs are in over 90 museum collections. Some of his photographs were used by Edward Steichen in 1955 in his The Family of Man, a vast exhibition consisting of over 500 photos that depicted life, love and death in 68 countries.

My 2 cents:

Bullock’s work has a very mythical, fantasy feel to it. The use of nudity in his images captures a sense of vulnerability and innocence. The continued use of “fog-like” mass in his landscape images delivers a mysterious environment. I enjoy Bullock’s work and would like to research more of him.

Some of Wynn Bullock’s work:

To find more info or work of this photographer go here:
Link 1, Link 2



Creative Assign. #4 – Jenna Law

The Power & Light District in Kansas City is still going through construction. Many restaurants are now open, with several still to follow. There was a Home Show at the convention center as well as a KC Brigade game going on that day. I really enjoy the architecture KC offers; everytime I make my way there something new is happening. It was a overcast day, but I managed to pull some activity in the sky through Lightroom.

Click here for my slideshow.

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